Usability Testing refers to evaluating a product or service by testing it with representative users. Typically, during a test, participants will try to complete typical tasks while observers watch, listen and takes notes.  The goal is to identify any usability problems, collect qualitative and quantitative data and determine the participant’s satisfaction with the product.

  • An evaluative method to observe a user’s task-based experience with a digital applications
  • Identifies frustrating and confusing parts of an interface so that they can be fixed and retested prior to launch.
  • Typically employs Think-Aloud Protocol, detecting problems by observing instances where the user:
    1. Understands the task but can’t complete it within a reasonable amount of time
    2. Understands the goal, but has to try different approaches to complete the task
    3. Gives up or resigns from the process
    4. Completes a task, but not the specified task
    5. Expresses surprise or delight
    6. Expresses frustration, confusion, or blames themselves for not being able to complete the task
    7. Asserts that something is wrong or doesn’t make sense
    8. Makes a suggestion for the interface or the flow of events

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