A series of steps (“flow”) that users complete for a specific task. It is a single flow completed similarly by all users for a specific action. Ex. Sign Up. Task flows have a singular flow, they don’t branch out.

One of the different diagrams which map out the structure, hierarchy, organization, and relationships across content and features of our designs.

So that people who use the design (e.g. a product, service, experience) can fluidly navigate through the design to accomplish their desired goals.

Task flows are similar to user flows, except they’re generally linear without multiple branches or paths. E.g., all users would follow the same steps to complete that specific action, such as creating an account or going through a checkout process.

Task flows tend to be linear, showing the high-level steps that a person would take to get to a specific goal or end point. Task flows tend not to branch out with options or decision points, tend to be linear and sequential, and are generally meant to be simple, rather than complex.

To build a desirable task flow you need to understand all the different aspects around the pain-point, challenge you want to solve. The practice of researching and setting up user personas involves understanding user needs, motivations, goals, and constraints and allows us to empathize with the way users solve problems. In their analysis, design teams sometimes focus on the who and how, but forget the why. To understand the why, explore questions like:

  • Who is the user (demographics, roles, skills/knowledge level)?
  • What motivates the user to perform each task?
  • What are the user’s end goals?
  • What user-needs are met by completing a task?
  • What obstacles might a user face while completing a task?
  • Are there any usage constraints to consider?

 

Further Readings,

More Readings,

An interview in qualitative research is a conversation where questions are asked to elicit information. The interviewer is usually a professional or paid researcher, sometimes trained, who poses questions to the interviewee, in an alternating series ...

A systematic examination of the material, aesthetic, and interactive qualities of objects It asks what objects say about people and their culture, time, and place rather than focusing on what people say about the products and systems they use. ...

Objects and environments should be designed to be usable, without modification, by as many people as possible. The principle of accessibility asserts that designs should be usable by people of diverse abilities, without special adaptation or modific...

Capturing the day-to-day context in which people engage with your product or service This captures what customers do, think, and use as they set out to achieve a goal that involves your product or service. It provides a framework that desig...

Card sorting is a method used to help design or evaluate the information architecture of a site. In a card sorting session, participants organize topics into categories that make sense to them and they may also help you label these groups. Used ...

Usability Report, When reporting results from a usability test, you should focus primarily on your findings and recommendations that are differentiated by levels of severity.  Include the pertinent information from the test plan and present just en...