An interviewing technique that reveals connections between a product’s characteristics and personal values

  • It builds on Means–End Theory, which posits that people make purchasing decisions based on consequences afforded by using the product.
  • Connects a product’s obvious physical characteristics to values by repeatedly asking “Why” questions.
  • As the conversation builds on itself to reveal what a person values, the “ladder” is constructed that connects product attributes to the consequences and to the individual’s values.
  • Consequences are the benefit or the impact that the product has on a person and reveal another layer about what is important.
  • Values expose the root cause behind why a product resonates profoundly with a person.
  • Seven values are often the motivation behind purchasing behavior: self-esteem, accomplishment, belonging, self-fulfillment, family, satisfaction, and security.

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