Hooked template, was represented through the Hooked book, and it helps us to find ways to Build Habit-Forming Products.

A hook has four parts:

  1. Trigger: External & Internal. Need to shift from external to internal triggers over time.
  2. Action: Similar to Fogg Behavior Model -> Motivation and Ability relative to Trigger. Simplicity is a function of your scarcest resource in that moment.
  3. (Variable) Reward: Three types – tribe (social), hunt (resources), and self (achievement).
  4. Investment: Use to 1) Load the next trigger; and 2) Store value to improve the product with use (e.g., content, data, followers, reputation). Leverages reciprocity and cognitive dissonance.

More Readings,

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