Eye tracking is the process of measuring either the point of gaze (where one is looking) or the motion of an eye relative to the head. An eye tracker is a device for measuring eye positions and eye movement.

  • Technical information documenting where and f or how long people are looking when using an interface or interacting with products
  • Eye movements tracked during reading or image-gaze tasks are identified for moments of fixation and rapid movements from point to point between fixations.
  • Technology traces and documents patterns, generating data for interface and design usability studies.
  • Optical methods are used to capture corneal reflections of infrared light on video using sophisticated cameras. Small sensing electrodes precisely detect movements.
  • It can help examine printed text and visual materials, engaging with products or product assembly tasks, and navigating environments.
  • Data is used to generate heat maps, aggregating data from several participants for a visual analysis of scan patterns and distributed attention.
  • Eyetracking should be triangulated with other research methods to understand user motivations, information processing, or comprehension.

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