The experience prototype is a simulation of the service experience that foresees some of its performances through the use of the specific physical touchpoints involved. The experience prototype allows designers to show and test the solution through an active participation of the users.

  • Active participation in design through subjective engagement with a prototype system or service, product, or place
  • Similar to role-playing and bodystorming, low-fidelity prototypes or props are used to help create a realistic scenario of use and activate felt experiences.
  • For exploring and evaluating ideas, design teams can use this method internally and with clients and users.
  • Prototypes may include simple props and role-playing or physical and digital prototypes with some level of functionality tested in realistic situations.
  • Experience prototyping is effective for persuading key audiences of the values inherent in design concepts, through direct and active engagement.
  • A level of functionality allows realistic engagement, yet with a caution that the prototype represents a work in progress and not the final design artifact.
  • Advantages are a low cost and addressing situations that will prevent real-life experiences because of inherent risks and dangers or complicating logistics.

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