Weighted Decision Matrix. A weighted decision matrix is a tool used to compare alternatives with respect to multiple criteria of different levels of importance. It can be used to rank all the alternatives relative to a “fixed” reference and thus create a partial order fo the alternatives.

  • Identify and prioritize the most promising opportunities from multiple design concepts
  • It creates a forum for conversation and shared decision-making and can help overcome the common biases on multidisciplinary teams.
  • The underlying concept is simple but powerful: the matrix ranks potential design opportunities against key success criteria.
  • The “criteria” represents the primary measures of product success rated on a scale, as defined by the product team and organizational stakeholders.
  • A listing of “opportunities” represents the design ideas that elicit the most serious interest from the team.
  • Once there is an agreed upon recommended list, another creative “deep dive” can now refocus on newly agreed-upon design ideas.
  • The method provides a structured process for team conversations, shifting decision-making to a process grounded in success criteria, not personal opinions.

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