The User-centered design (UCD) process outlines the phases throughout a design and development life-cycle all while focusing on gaining a deep understanding of who will be using the product. The international standard 13407 Site exit Disclaimer is the basis for many UCD methodologies. It’s important to note that the UCD process does not specify exact methods for each phase.

  • Specify the context of use: Identify the people who will use the product, what they will use it for, and under what conditions they will use it.
  • Specify requirements: Identify any business requirements or user goals that must be met for the product to be successful.
  • Create design solutions: This part of the process may be done in stages, building from a rough concept to a complete design.
  • Evaluate designs: Evaluation – ideally through usability testing with actual users – is as integral as quality testing is to good software development.

Step by Step UCD Guide

References

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