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Through the Brief Book, Joseph McCormack tells us about the Elusive 600 and how to use it in the aim to present great ideas in little words.

We have the mental capacity to comprehend 750 words a minute but most people speak at 150 words a minute. That leaves 600 extra words a minute that we can still process. As a result, we often fill that void with random thoughts.

Joseph McCormack

As McCormack says, “we have to make those 150 words meaningful enough for our audience to truly focus on them.” not only focus but also we need to choose words that can open the imagination of our user’s mind to a specific idea.

We use many helpful interaction-models to represent our ideas and concepts, one of the most important parts will be always the linguistic model.

Such idea helps us to create effective stories. there always a story behind representing any kind of data (product page, about us, services page) whatever, which will shape our target audience decision and affect the product future in general accordingly.

However Less is more, but also remember the rule “Don’t make me think”, so we have to choose clear/short words which control the way our user’s minds will fill the extra 600 words with.

Please, don’t take the mentioned numbers as a reference, take the idea and build a little content that leaves a big impact.

References

More Readings,

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Desk research is another name for secondary research. Broadly speaking, there are two types of research activity: primary research (where you go out and discover stuff yourself); and secondary research (where you review what other people have done). ...

Think-aloud (or thinking aloud) protocol (also talk-aloud protocol) is a protocol used to gather data in usability testing in product design and development, in psychology and a range of social sciences (e.g., reading, writing, translation research, ...

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A systematic examination of the material, aesthetic, and interactive qualities of objects It asks what objects say about people and their culture, time, and place rather than focusing on what people say about the products and systems they use. ...

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