A storyboard is a graphic organizer in the form of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of pre-visualizing a motion picture, animation, motion graphic, user interactions,  or interactive media sequence.

  • A visual narrative that generates empathy and communicates the context for proposed design solutions
  • Five design practices common to visual storytelling:
    • Refine drawings so that they show enough context, but not so much that details begin to distract from the purpose of the storyboard.
    • Use text to supplement the visuals in a storyboard when it would otherwise take too much effort to illustrate a concept or idea.
    • Emphasize people, products, or both, depending on whether you want to elicit an emotional impact or get technical or evaluative feedback on the concept.
    • Use three to six panels to communicate an idea, with each storyboard focused on one salient concept.
    • To show time lapses, use design elements such as clocks, calendars, or the movement of the sun.

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