.

An interviewing technique that reveals connections between a product’s characteristics and personal values

  • It builds on Means–End Theory, which posits that people make purchasing decisions based on consequences afforded by using the product.
  • Connects a product’s obvious physical characteristics to values by repeatedly asking “Why” questions.
  • As the conversation builds on itself to reveal what a person values, the “ladder” is constructed that connects product attributes to the consequences and to the individual’s values.
  • Consequences are the benefit or the impact that the product has on a person and reveal another layer about what is important.
  • Values expose the root cause behind why a product resonates profoundly with a person.
  • Seven values are often the motivation behind purchasing behavior: self-esteem, accomplishment, belonging, self-fulfillment, family, satisfaction, and security.

More Readings,

By now UX researchers are familiar with the importance of understanding the usage context of an interface–the physical environment where people are normally using an interface. Remote research opens the door to conducting research that also happens...

Experience sampling is a way to find out more about an experience while the event is actually happening. Participants stop what they are doing and take time to note their experiences over a period of days, weeks, or even years — which can result in...

The cognitive walkthrough is a usability evaluation method in which one or more evaluators work through a series of tasks and ask a set of questions from the perspective of the user. The focus of the cognitive walkthrough is on understanding the syst...

The placement of elements such that edges line up along common rows or columns, or their bodies along a common center. Alignment The whole point of the alignment principle is that nothing in your slide design should look as if it were pla...

A systematic examination of the material, aesthetic, and interactive qualities of objects It asks what objects say about people and their culture, time, and place rather than focusing on what people say about the products and systems they use. ...

In the social sciences, triangulation is often used to indicate that two (or more) methods are used in a study in order to check the results of one and the same subject. "The concept of triangulation is borrowed from navigational and land surveying t...

What about my blog ? Topics may you like.