Comparing two versions of a design to see which performs better against a predetermined goal

• A/B testing is an optimization technique that allows you to compare two different versions of a design to see which one gets you closer to a business objective.

• Tests are run by randomly assigning different people down two paths—the “A” test and the “B” test—until a statistically relevant sample size is reached.

• Testing can assess design aspects such as different treatments of text copy (tone, length, and font size); form elements (how many, layout, and which are required); and different treatments of the button or call to action (page placement, size, color, and labeling).

• A/B testing won’t help you understand why the design was preferred over the alternate, so pair it with qualitative methods to gain a deeper understanding of customer trust, desires, attitudes, and needs.

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